A Sign That More Housing Inventory Is Coming

Homeowners who have decided to stay put in their current properties may soon be ready for a move, helping to relieve stubbornly tight housing inventory. The evidence is in Fannie Mae’s latest Home Purchase Sentiment Index, in which the number of consumers who say now is a good time to sell a home neared an all-time high. The index—which is a measure of about 1,000 consumers’ attitudes toward housing—rose 1.2 points in August to a reading of 88, reflecting a year-over-year jump of 21 percentage points in the number of consumers who looked favorably on selling. The August reading is just shy of the index’s record high of 88.3, set in July.

Meanwhile, the number of consumers who say now is a good time to buy dropped 5 percentage points in August to a new survey low for the second consecutive month. The number of those who look favorably on buying is down 16 percentage points year over year, Fannie Mae reports.

“In the early stages of the economic expansion, homeselling sentiment trailed homebuying sentiment by a significant margin. The reverse is true today,” says Fannie Mae chief economist Doug Duncan. “The net ‘good time to sell’ share is now double the net ‘good time to buy’ share, with record-high percentages of consumers citing home prices as the primary reason for both perceptions. Such a sizable gap between selling and buying sentiment, if it persists, could weigh on the housing market through the rest of the year.” 

Here are some additional findings from Fannie Mae’s August sentiment index reading:

  • 36 percent: Consumers who say now is a good time to sell, an uptick of 8 percentage points from July.
  • 18 percent: Consumers who say now is a good time to buy a home, a new survey low.
  • 48 percent: Americans who say home prices will rise, up 1 percentage point month over month.
  • 74 percent: Consumers who say they are not concerned about losing their job, a 1 percentage point drop in August.
  • 16 percent: Americans who say their household income is significantly higher than it was 12 months ago, unchanged from July.

Source: Fannie Mae

 MS Leading The Way To Economic Growth

First-Time Homebuyer Savings Accounts

Who Is It For?  Any Mississipian who has never purchased, owned, or partially owned a home in MS or any other state.

What Is It?  A savings account for first-time homebuyer that offers tax advantages for individuals up to $2,500 a year and up to $5,000 a year for couples.

Where Can A Buyer Create An Account?  Buyers can create an account at any financial institution licensed to do business in MS.  It can be a cash deposit account or money market account.

When Can A Buyer Create One?  Buyers can open an account and start saving today.  They can start taking a tax deduction beginning in the 2018 tax year.

Why Would A Buyer Want To Create One? When buyers are ready to buy a single family home, they will have money saved to help make the purchase.  Plus, money deposited in the account is deductible from state income, which lowers their tax bills. Interest earned on the deposits is also free from state income tax.

Visit  firsthomems.org  for more information.

 


Mississippi Ranked #2 In USA For Retirees!!  Here Are Some Fast Facts About Retiring In The Magnolia State
TAX-FRIENDLY
Mississippi offers a sweet income-tax deal for retirees. It not only exempts Social Security benefits from state income taxes, but it also excludes all qualified retirement income from state income taxes. Remaining income is taxed at a maximum 5%. Mississippi is home to some of the cheapest property taxes in the nation. Residential property is taxed at 10% of its assessed value, and seniors qualify for a homestead exemption on the first $75,000 of value.
STATE SALES TAX
7%. Prescription drugs, residential utilities, motor fuel, newspapers, health-care services, and payments made by Medicare and Medicaid are exempt. County and city taxes may add an additional 3% to the state rate.
INCOME-TAX RANGE
3% – 5%
EXEMPTIONS FOR RETIREMENT INCOME
Qualified retirement income is exempt from state income tax. Social Security is not taxed, regardless of total income. Retirement income from IRAs, 401s/403s, Keoghs, and qualified public and private pension plans is not taxable. Interest income from federal securities and obligations of Mississippi and its political subdivisions are all exempt.
PROPERTY TAXES
Property and automobiles are both subject to ad valorem taxes -- meaning that the tax is assessed in relationship to the value of the property. Single-family residential property is taxed at 10% of its assessed value. All other personal property is assessed at 15% of its value. Motor vehicles are taxed at 30% of their value. The state offers a homestead exemption to all eligible taxpayers. Eligible homeowners should apply with the tax assessor in the county where the home is located. This application must be filed between January 1 and April 1. The maximum exemption for regular homeowners is $300. For homeowners 65 years of age or totally disabled, there is an exemption on the first $75,000 of true value. You do not have to apply for homestead exemption each year. You should reapply if there were changes in your homestead status (marital, property, ownership, etc.).
INHERITANCE AND ESTATE TAXES
There is no inheritance tax and no estate tax.
Read more: http://kiplinger.com/tools/retiree_map/index.html?map=14&state_id=25&state=Mississippi&si=1#ixzz1SezYkfoe


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